Nick Sisley Tests Hunting Shotguns

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The Maxus Hunter is a perfect companion for the upland hunter or clay shooter who still values the feel of a well-built, classically-styled field gun. It was designed for hard work and has the same heavy-duty guts as any of the other Maxus variants. For starters, the Power Drive Gas System has larger ports that allow increased flow from high-powered loads.

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But the Hunter model is aimed more toward wingshooters and clay-bird enthusiasts who are more likely to be shooting very light loads. The larger gas ports and a 20 percent longer stroke mean that the Maxus will cycle anything you feed it. Perhaps the most obvious difference between the Maxus and other gas-operated shotguns is the missing magazine cap. Instead, the Maxus has a unique system called a Speed Lock Forearm that appears to belong on an over-under instead of a semi-auto.

Simply press the button, lift the latch and slide the forearm off. This feature makes removal of the forearm faster and easier. The forearm is slim and decorated with 22 line-per-inch checkering you would see on a top-shelf field gun, which the Maxus is.

Nick Sisley, Author at Shoot On - Hunting, Firearms

With the forearm removed, all that is required to remove the magazine plug is a car key thanks to Browning's innovative Turnkey Magazine Plug. The Maxus also has a magazine cutoff switch on the left side of the receiver so that the chamber can be unloaded without emptying the magazine. Browning has kept weight to a minimum thanks to an aluminum alloy receiver with a good-looking satin nickel finish complete with a laser-engraved pheasant on the right side of the receiver and a duck on the left.

Baikal IZH18 20 bore shotgun. Pattern testing and pigeon hunt

And it, especially when standing around a tailgate or a keyboard, would likely prove profitable. Afield after birds tho? Scattergun weight At 5'8" and about lbs right after dinner, a 7 pound gun would be nothing more than a way to lose the extra weight I gained at the dinner table. There is no way someone of my build should be hauling that anchor through the grouse woods or even less, while hunting the prairies! Perhaps I'm missing something, or just oversimplifying, but I believe that weight of the shotgun is a personal preference thing.

I don't believe you can really say that shotguns whether made today or in the past that are below a certain weight are objectively "whippy" or too light, nor can you say they are just too heavy for anyone.

It's a matter of opinion. I can tell you right now that I would find many shotguns quite pleasurable to carry and shoot that my wife who knows her way around a shotgun would consider much too heavy and cumbersome. Just so, I have a shotgun from my grandfather-in-law that is much heavier and longer than I'd care to carry out in the woods on a long day's hunt, but from what I'm told, he was a man substantially taller and larger than I who had spent his life working in the citrus fields of Florida.

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We see phenomenal shooters shooting at the same shots on the same days in various clay competitions. Even with the conditions and shots identical, and the fact that the shooters are all of comparable top shelf quality, some choose the "whippier" Italian guns, some the more "ponderous" Germans, and some others. Different people prefer and shoot better with different guns of different weights. Regardless, I think we should limit this thread to its original aim: showing off those gorgeous 28 GA shotguns and making me wonder how I'm going to explain it to my wife when I am inevitably overcome by temptation and I arrive home one afternoon with a new gun and a smoking credit card One of these days I will get a really nice 28 gauge side by side, got my eye on a RBL but for now I'll keep using my Ithaca pump.

Around 6lbs even and points like a magic wand. Multiflora, writers don't have a whole lot to gain by promoting a gauge or weight of gun. I field tested a 28ga Cynergy Lightning Feather, really liked it and shot it well. It just doesn't have that "classic" look. So what is it you think we're trying to sell. The LODGH info I quoted was about 30 years old, and I'm sure that it would now show an even greater bias for the smaller bores, with 28's being far more common now than they were then.

There just weren't that many 28ga doubles, other than skeet guns, back in the early 80's. That was before the Parker Repro 28 they sold 4, of those , the RBL, the CZ on the less expensive end--not to mention Spanish 28's, which are, as a group, likely the most common 28ga sxs out there.

Nick Sisley

But there were not a lot of Spanish 28's around in the early 80's. Then you have a whole flock of lighter 28ga OU's, from the Red Label which isn't all that light for a 28 on up in price. And the relatively recently-introduced Benelli 28ga auto, at just a bit over 5. But if you want to give writers credit for promoting the lightweight small bores for grouse and woodcock, then perhaps we also deserve credit for the heavier, longer-barreled target guns now in vogue?

But again, there would not be much of an advantage to a particular make or model of gun--although perhaps a boost to the industry as a whole in selling guns with longer barrels. I doubt that many folks went in search of a 16ga Greener with 24" barrels after reading what Hill wrote, although they might have thought: "Well maybe, shorter and lighter would work OK for grouse and woodcock.

Yes Sharpshooter, you are dead on. Further to that, we need to keep in mind that where someone in one state hunts a species and where someone else hunts that same species in another state can bring with it huge variations. Add the variations I alluded to in the hunter him or herself to that, such as his height, weight, build, arm length, etc. Also add the weather conditions, the breed of dog used - if used, etc.

Here's where I was coming from.

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Nick Sisley has been testing shotguns and writing about those tests for decades. This book is a report on 25 different hunting-type shotguns; semi-autos, over. Nick Sisley welcomes your emails at [email protected] Argentina Duck Hunting While Stuck in the Mud With My Perazzi . the introductory testing of new shotgun models, but I'm pretty sure such testing takes place in.

So, think about this. We might walk many many miles for 3 hours in the morning and if it's a decent hunt, you're also now carrying say Get back to the truck for lunch, switch up dogs and do the same for the afternoon. Consider now, that's it's day 3 of said hunt.

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Let's now throw in a 7 pound 12 gauge. Surely you will bring at least 20 - 25 12 gauge shells with you before setting out. There comes a point where the weight, design and gauge plays a significant part in MY hunting scenario and it's more than personal preference. Gain is in filling copy space Then you have a whole flock of lighter 28ga OU's, from the Red Label which isn't all that light for a 2 on up in price. Not only were there less 28s back in ish so was there no Vintagers, perhaps to a degree there was less disposable income in a household, more game around so less time was available to think what does not work and I agree, boredom, free choice and marketing has bloomed the smaller bores.

Most of us here understand what was and was not available in scattergun choice I do not credit writers with exclusive credit toward the popularity of the smaller bores for grouse and woodcock. That was an odd comment Writers of gun copy most often follow and toot a trite tuba That Greener or Foster's "Little Gun" would both work well Kinda the point, Lar.

I know I like mine for ruffed grouse I hunted 6 days in Kansas in December and again in January carrying the 7 16 is a 7 12 gauge heavier? Knowing the state of Kansas pheasants would indicate how much walking resulted.

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Not a tough guy but I managed to cope When 7 becomes a burden of circassion and steel While I tote several bottles of water for the dogs at times, cartouches has always proven to be plenty We all, again, manage to cope but Escape will close this window. Get started. Continue with Facebook.

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No matter if your passion is long-range rifles, fancy shotguns, gritty Old West single-action revolvers or sleek semi-auto pistols, Gun Digest delivers. Remove the bones. By Nick Sisley Does your shotgun really fit perfectly, or are you just "adapting" to it? He also beefed up the sides of his new receiver, adding more strength. The outer end of the barrel 76 of a weapon is externally threaded as indicated at

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